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The Joys of Art

Thursday, October 12, 2006

WE ARE NOT IMPRESSED MR. CHENEY!!!!

IMPRESS US BY ATTENDING THE VOICE OF THE WETLANDS FESTIVAL THIS WEEKEND....OTHERWISE SHUT THE HELL MR. VICE PRESIDENT CHENEY.....I TOTALLY DO NOT RESPECT YOU AT ALL!!!!! SHUT UP!!!! DO US A FAVOR AND GO THE HELL AWAY!!!!! YAWN!!!! GOVERNOR BLANCO, EVEN YOU COULDN'T GET ME TO LIKE PRESIDENT BUSH AND VICE PRESIDENT CHENEY AND YOU KNOW I'D DO ANYTHING FOR YOU EXCEPT LIKE THOSE VIPERS!!!!!! GO BYE BYE MR. TRICKY DICKY!!!! TOODLES "SNOOKIE BUG"!!!!NOW SEE WHAT YOU DONE DID MR. CHENEY?!!!I HAD TYPED UP THIS EARLIER BUT I LOST MY POST SO NOW THAT YOU DONE PROVOKED ME TO WRATH I AM GOING TO POP OFF THIS POST BEFORE I GO ON MY WEEK LONG FAST....IT CONCERNS "SERVICE TO SELF ORGANIZATIONS" (IE THE DARK, NEFARIOUS GROUPS AND HOW THEY PROVOKE ORDER OUT OF CHAOS AND THE GENERATING OF LOOSH) AND HOW THE ENTIRE PLANET IS AN UNWITTING PARTICIPANT TO THEIR DARK DESIGN....MR. CHENEY YOU ARE THE EPITOME OF "SERVICE TO SELF"....You get prayer for the next seven days Mr. Cheney!!!!

Cheney collects campaign cash, talks flood control in NO

In his first trip to New Orleans in more than a year, Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday came to collect campaign cash at a Republican National Committee fundraiser and to get an eyeful of the city’s recovery, his spokeswoman said.
Whisked down a closed I-10 in a motorcade, Cheney arrived at about 3 p.m. at the Port of New Orleans, where he was greeted by five first responders before boarding a tugboat for a private meeting with Gulf Coast Recovery Czar Donald Powell, U.S. Sen. David Vitter, R-Metairie, and Brig. Gen. Robert Crear, commander of the Mississippi Valley division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
Emerging from the closed-door session, Cheney briefly took reporter's questions. He said the briefing had focused on levees and flood control.
"Clearly, that's one of the most important parts of recovery process, which is altogether fitting given that this was the worst natural disaster in American history.”
Cheney acknowledged unfilled gaps in the recovery work, but said overall he was “tremendously impressed."
"We’ve got a lot of work to do yet, but it looks like the levees are back to pre-Katrina levels, and in some cases, better than that."
Cheney's spokeswoman, Lea Anne McBride, said Cheney “initially planned to come to the RNC event, and the vice president wanted to build in some time to see people affected by Katrina and find out where they stand in the recovery process.”
Meanwhile in Washington, the Democratic National Committee issued a news release mocking Cheney’s trip, saying he planned no sojourns to flooded areas of the city and calling the trip window-dressing for a fundraising junket.
Powell, addressing that criticism on Cheney's behalf, said, "That's unfortunate. I think he spent his time very wisely" focusing on flood control and economic issues.
Cheney left the tug boat to attend the RNC ceremony at the World Trade Center.


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LAND LOST
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita turned 217 square miles of coastal land and wetlands into water
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
By Mark Schleifstein
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita ripped away 217 square miles of Louisiana's fragile coastline, with each turning huge swaths of land to water overnight, accelerating a process that already posed grave threats to coastal communities, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study.

Survey scientists compared satellite images taken in 2004 with similar images from October 2005 to match areas that were wetlands, undeveloped dry land and farmland with what looked like open water several weeks after the storms.

The survey underscores the state's repeated demands that federal officials speed efforts to rebuild the Louisiana coastline, both to protect fragile fisheries and wildlife and to augment the buffer of plants, soils and barrier islands that can slow the approach of killer storm surges.

Indeed, Gov. Kathleen Blanco last week brandished the study, then not yet publicly released, to buttress her lawsuit attempting to block the federal Minerals Management Service from holding additional offshore oil lease sales. The governor seeks to force the agency to first perform a proper environmental assessment of the effects of oil and gas production on the state's wetlands.

"I am using every tool available to me to fight the federal government and will not allow them to continue to disregard the safety and environmental health of our fragile coastline any longer," Blanco said in a statement.

Wetlands plan outdated

In southeastern Louisiana, the study results show that the sea swallowed 79.2 square miles of land and wetlands east of the Mississippi River.

"We had a 50-year projection for wetlands loss as part of the Louisiana Coastal Area Ecosystem Restoration plan," said USGS scientist Jimmy Johnston., referring to the proposed $1.2 billion collection of restoration projects still awaiting congressional approval. "Guess what? That's outdated. We went through 40 percent of that loss with these storm events."

"We feel it's actually going to be less than that, and some will recover, but it's still too soon to tell," he said.

Of the total land lost, Plaquemines Parish took the brunt of the land loss: 57.2 square miles. The biggest chunk of that loss came in a pie-shaped section of wetlands south of the St. Bernard hurricane levees, on the eastern side of the Mississippi River. Before the storm, the Caernarvon Freshwater Diversion Project had rebuilt land that area had lost in years of erosion.

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